Collapse bottom bar
Subscribe
Bow Reviews

Mathews Creed Review

by Jon E. Silks   |  August 12th, 2013 2

If you have never had the privilege of touring the Mathews manufacturing facility in Sparta, Wis., you can catch a glimpse of their world-class machinery and capabilities by watching the “Introducing the Mathews Creed” video found on the company website. Among other things, you will witness state-of-the-art CNC machining and futuristic robotics.

Mathews is focused on the enjoyment and overall experience an archer is afforded when shooting one of its bows. The flagship Creed was created with a synergistic approach, meaning they brought together all of the top technologies from previous models into mechanical and aesthetic harmony. The Creed is outfitted with the SimPlex Solocam, split parallel limbs, super lightweight GeoGrid Lock riser, and much more.

Simplification
Mathews owner Matt McPherson says that single-cam bows are the most efficient and simplest cam system in the world. What Mathews calls Advanced Simplicity is aptly expressed by Leonardo da Vinci in one of my all-time favorite quotes: “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” It is a truly amazing accomplishment to advance a technology through a process of simplification.

To that end, the Creed’s SimPlex cam system raises the bar on bow efficiency while producing a super smooth draw cycle and excellent arrow speeds on a comfortable, 7-inch brace height and 80 percent system letoff. Cam and idler wheel ride on stainless steel axles and sealed bearings for reduced friction and increased efficiency. Draw lengths from 26-30 inches, in half-inch increments,  are offered through separate cams.

Unification
The Creed’s riser serves to unify many of the technologies and features showcased on this new rig. First, the riser itself is a feature with GeoGrid Lock structure, which uses interlocking bridges in a pattern that flows with the Creed’s contour to build strength and stiffness while eliminating excess material.

Another riser-based benefit is offered by the company’s Reverse Assist Roller Guard, which gets part of its name from the position of the cables on the rollers. Rather than placing the cables in the typical position under the rollers, Mathews reverses the position of the cables, placing them over the rollers and closer to the archer where they are held in position by the system’s tension.

Unlike typical roller guard systems that get tighter and tighter as the bow is drawn, this configuration decreases tension, resulting in less torque and a smoother draw.

The one-piece Walnut SlimFit Inline grip is fitted to and blended with the riser for comfort and function. It sports a smooth finish, ergonomic contours and a comfortable size and angle. The polished wood allows the shooter’s hand to repeatedly move into position without excess torque, and a distinctive layered line in the grip indicates the centerline of the bow, making initial setup and tuning easier.

Dulcification
To dulcify something is to make it agreeable or sweeter. In an effort to make our shooting experience sound and feel sweeter, Mathews has added several features and technologies. For starters is the configuration of the split limbs—yes, I said split limbs. The Creed represents the very first Mathews Solocam bow with quad-limb technology. Matt and his team weighed the benefits and found the Creed performed better and more
efficiently with the split-limb design. Creed split limbs reach a parallel position at full draw, which brings inherent benefits in reduced vibration, shock and noise.

Mathews’ Harmonic Stabilizer Lite is nearly 70 percent lighter than the original while reducing 75 percent of residual vibration running through the riser. The Dead End String Stop Lite and Monkey Tails also attack vibration and noise by dampening string oscillation at the shot for a fast reduction of string movement.

Impressions
First impressions are always important, and mine was favorable of the Creed. When I first picked it up, the light mass weight was noticeable. Couple that with the 30-inch axle-to-axle length and it makes the bow quite maneuverable.

The draw cycle is consistent and smooth, building all the way to the break over point. A very slight bump was felt in the handle at the shot, but I could detect no vibration. The grip is my favorite Mathews model to date, and the bow was stable on target. In the end, I think Mathews accomplished exactly what it was shooting for with the Creed — a bow that blends performance, comfort and enjoyment in an overall shooting experience.

  • salt

    I shot both the creed and the chill and the chill is by far the better bow

    • creed

      don’t agree

back to top