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Image Gallery: Pigs & Patriots

by Christian Berg   |  April 19th, 2011 0

Bowhunting editor Christian Berg recently had the opportunity to hunt hogs with the U.S Army Marksmanship Unit in Ft. Benning, Georgia. The following is an image gallery of his hunt with some of our nation’s finest.


From left, Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement, Staff Sgt. Brandon Green, Staff Sgt. Emil Kovan and Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach are members of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit’s Service Rifle Team and avid bowhunters. Here, they pose at the entrance to Fort Benning’s Uchee Creek Archery Club, one of many outdoor recreation facilities the military provides for soliders at the sprawling Georgia installation.

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Fort Benning, Ga., covers a sprawling 180,000 acres, and a maze of dirt roads used for military training exercises makes it easy to get disoriented. However, the roads also provide easy access to vast tracts of prime deer, turkey and hog hunting areas.

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Much of Fort Benning is dominated by large stands of pine such as this.

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With bows in hand, Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement, left, and Staff Sgt. Brandon Green head into the woods in search of wild hogs.

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Low-lying areas such as this are prime areas to look for hogs, which roam through in groups rooting up the soft soil in search of acorns, insects, roots and anything else they can get their snouts on.

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The key to a successful hog hunt is covering lots of ground, playing the wind and spotting the hogs before they spot or smell you. Once a group of hogs is located, you can put a spot-and-stalk game plan together.

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Freshly turned earth such as this is a sure sign hogs are working an area.

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From left, Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement, Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach and Staff Sgt. Emil Kovan look over a topographic map of Fort Benning and discuss areas where wild hogs are likely to congreate.

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Clockwise from top, Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement, Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach and Staff Sgt. Emil Kovan look over a topographic map of Fort Benning and discuss areas where wild hogs are likely to congreate.

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Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement poses with a nice, eating-sized wild hog he took with his Mathews bow during a March 2010 hunt on Fort Benning, Ga.

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Sgt. 1st Class Lance Dement poses with a nice, eating-sized wild hog he took with his Mathews bow during a March 2010 hunt on Fort Benning, Ga.

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Because so much of Fort Benning is dominated by pines, you can cover ground quietly and scan for hogs that present excellent spot-and-stalk opportunities.

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If you’re going to hunt like a soldier, you gotta eat like one too. Here, BOWHUNTING Editor Christian Berg shows off the delicious MRE he had for lunch.

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Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach used his BowTech Admiral to take this feral hog during a March 2010 hunt on Fort Benning, Ga.

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From left, Staff Sgt. Emil Kovan and Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach show off a feral hog Steinbach killed during a March 2010 hunt on Fort Benning, Ga.

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BOWHUNTING Editor Christian Berg, left, shares a moment of celebration with Sgt. 1st Class David Steinbach after a successful hog hunt at Fort Benning, Ga.

Related posts:

  1. Gallery: Trick or Treat Whitetails
  2. Stay On Stand
  3. Feral Hogs: Scourge of the South
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Related posts:

  1. Gallery: Trick or Treat Whitetails
  2. Stay On Stand
  3. Feral Hogs: Scourge of the South
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